6 replies, 2 voices Last updated by Profile photo of Lonny Lonny 7 months ago
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  • #32799
    Profile photo of Lonny
    Lonny
    Participant
    @dagos755

    Fellow herbalists,

    While I’m new to the college, I am passionate about learning and am not afraid to explore the riches that God has hidden within the plant kingdom. While many of us are familiar with the historical usage of herbs, there is still much that we do not know or understand. And great discoveries are still possible. For example, a herb which might have been previously known for being nothing more than a stimulant carminiative is now found to be just as effective as nitroglycerin for treating angina pectoris, but without the unwanted side effects. To this end, I would like to see a forum where people can openly share their stories about medicinal herbs, nutrition, water, etc.

    Now before I continue, I’d like to draw your attention to this quote from Pliny,

    “THE more highly esteemed plants of which I am now about to speak, and which are produced by the earth for medicinal purposes solely, inspire me with admiration of the industry and laborious research displayed by the ancients. Indeed there is nothing that they have not tested by experiment or left untried; no discovery of theirs which they have not disclosed, or which they have not been desirous to leave for the benefit of posterity. We, on the contrary, at the present day, make it our object to conceal and suppress the results of our labours, and to defraud our fellow-men of blessings even which have been purchased by others. For true it is, beyond all doubt, that those who have gained any trifling accession of knowledge, keep it to themselves, and envy the enjoyment of it by others; to leave mankind uninstructed…”

    The sad truth is that the above statement could have been written yesterday. Now in the interests of ‘breaking the ice’ with you, I wish to offer my own story: a woman with asthma came to me because she didn’t want to continue with the conventional drug treatment that her doctor had prescribed for her – which was cortiosteriods – a very effective treatment for bronchial inflammation but with some scary side effects. As I had some Lobelia tincture in the basement, I offered it to her. To my own surprise, she experienced significant relief and was able to throw those harmful drugs in the garbage. Later, after she had used up the bottle she asked for another, but I didn’t have any because the few seeds I had planted did not survive. Anyway, to my further surprise she remained symptom free even months after using up what I had given her. When I recommended an alternative supplier, she politely refused saying that what I had given her was much more potent than anything she had purchased from the store. She wanted mine. Anyway, I can’t take any real credit for the cure, as I did not make the plant, but I was happy to have made my little contribution. As a Christian I believe that (Ecclesiasticus 38:2) “all healing is from God”. And God’s Will overrides EVERYTHING.

    A little word of advice: if you truly want to help people and become successful at it, expect to be persecuted … just like Dr. Samuel Thompson, Rene Cassie or Dr. Nowicky – to name a few. The mediocrities will come after you seeking revenge for their gashed egos and lost sales.

    Yours affectionately,
    LD

  • #34352
    Profile photo of Lonny
    Lonny
    Participant
    @dagos755

    Scenario 1: A person with a severe allergy to peanuts has cleaned up their house of any contaminants. While on a camping trip the person goes on a long hike with friends but forgets to bring his epi-pen. A few hours into the hike, they sit down for bite to eat and one of the hikers unknowingly offers the man a desert with peanuts in it. The man begins to have an anaphylactic reaction. What do you do? Nearby are some herbs which might might save his life.

    You need a plant that will stop histamine production and break down what has already been released. What four herbs would you like to have around you?

  • #65253
    Profile photo of Ruth
    Ruth
    Participant
    @rtolerton

    Elderberry, stinging nettle and jewelweed

  • #114141
    Profile photo of Lonny
    Lonny
    Participant
    @dagos755

    Since the Government legalized Cannabis a lot of herbalists are now choosing to incorporate this medicine into some of their formulas. Although I’ve never used the stuff myself, many people speak very highly of it – specifically those low THC (0.3-0.5%) and high CBD (14-17%) strains. Apparently, a good pain killer which does not cause constipation or grogginess like opioid drugs. Yet it seems to be much more than a pain killer and has shown great promise for treating certain types of cancer, epilepsy, schizophrenia. I probably wouldn’t use it by itself, but would be more inclined to mix it into a formula depending upon the specific type of pain involved. So where can a herbalist buy good quality seeds? A girl at the local health food store said Nelson B.C. is the “go to place” for such seeds.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of Lonny Lonny.
  • #125528
    Profile photo of Lonny
    Lonny
    Participant
    @dagos755

    In 2005, there was an article in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology (4 January 2005, Volume 96, Issues 1-2, Pages 183-193) listing Nauclea root as a traditional African remedy for treating malaria and abdominal pain, with nausea being one of its side-effects.

    In 2013, researchers reported that tramadol was found in relatively high concentrations (1%+) in the roots of the African pin cushion tree (Nauclea latifolia).

    In 2014, it was reported that the presence of tramadol in the tree roots was the result of ground contamination (i.e. farmers administering the drug to their cattle and then it being excreted into the earth through the animals urine. According to the story, tramadol and its mammalian metabolites were found in tree roots in the far north of Cameroon, but not in the south where it is not administered to farm animals.

    In 2014 an editorial in Lab Times online contested this fact stating that samples were taken from trees which grew in national parks, where livestock were forbidden; it also quoted researcher Michel de Waard, who stated that “thousands and thousands of tramadol-treated cattle sitting around a single tree and urinating there” would be required to produce the concentrations discovered.

    In 2015, supposed radiocarbon analysis confirmed that the tramadol found in N.latifolia roots could not be plant-derived and was of synthetic origin.

    This is all very strange and suspicious. Someone is obviously trying to mislead the public on the source of the drug tramadol. Thoughts on this?

  • #130209
    Profile photo of Lonny
    Lonny
    Participant
    @dagos755

    Silphium: the ancient wonder drug.

    A long time ago, in the ancient city of Cyrene, there was an exotic herb called silphium. Theophrastus wrote extensively about it. The plants had thick roots covered in black bark. They were extravagantly long; if you were to hold one up against the human body, it would be around the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger (an ancient unit of measurement known as a cubit). Though the plant was “most peculiar”, he said it had a hollow stalk a bit like fennel and golden leaves which resembled those of celery. He compared it to another herb, Magydaris pastinacea, which grew in Syria and on the slopes of Mount Parnassus near the Greek city of Delphi. A rare and finicky plant which resisted (like Huckleberry) all attempts at cultivation. It is thought to be represented in ancient Egyptian and Minoan civilization. The Romans mentioned silphium in their poems and songs, and valued its weight in silver coins or even gold. Unscrupulous dealers adulterated it and even replaced it with the notoriously stinky asafetida. The valuable product of the plant was its odiferous sap or resin, called laser. It was apparently so delicious and useful that Julius Caesar was said to have stored 1500 pounds of it in the Roman treasury. The Emperor Augustus ordered that all silphium be sent to Rome as tribute. It had many uses. It’s stalks could be eaten as a vegetable, from its blooms one could extract a beautiful perfume. But the greatest qualities of silphium came from its medicinal effects. It was in some sense a wonder drug, a panacea. It possessed potent analgesic, antiseptic and anti-tumor qualities. It also was used as a potent aphrodisiac and contraceptive. Its heart-shaped seeds are thought to be the reason we associate the symbol with romance to this day. Unfortunately, this plant was in such high demand that it was gradually made extinct, though there is a possibility that a few plant might still exist out there. There has only been a few plant surveys in Libya. “It could absolutely still be there. It’s not an easy country to survey,” says Monique Simmonds, deputy director of science at Kew Gardens, London. Scientists believe that like asafoetida, silphium may have belonged to a group of fennel-like plants, the Ferula. They are related to carrots and grow wild as weeds across North Africa and the Mediterranean. Incredibly, two of these plants – giant Tangier fennel and giant fennel – still exist in Libya today. It’s possible that one of these is silphium. Although we may never learn the true identity of silphium, we can learn from its decline.

  • #135531
    Profile photo of Lonny
    Lonny
    Participant
    @dagos755

    As we look deeper into a plants physical composition: its chemical and even atomic structure, the level of complexity rises exponentially to the point where it is virtually impossible to understand all the interactions going on. The mystery here is that the ancients knew how to combine certain plants to create very specific effects, but without this knowledge … So it seems that modern science is really just ‘catching up’ now with this deep science of the ancients.

    Many herbalists are unaware that by using relatively simple and natural process such as fermentation one can change the Coumarin (C9H6O2) present in Melilotus officinalis into the more potent anti-coagulant Dicoumarol (C19H12O6). And there are many other phytochemicals which can be similarly modified to yield effects many times greater than what would normally be achieved. No million dollar laboratory is required. All that is need is a deep understanding of pharmacology. And when this knowledge is properly exploited, it will open up huge doors for the practice of herbalism, doors which had been formerly closed. St. Hildegard for instance, was said to have received knowledge from the Archangel Raphael on how to make certain formulas – albeit very complicated and requiring very specific ingredients. The point is: while men’s knowledge of the human body and plants has greatly increased, thanks to modern technology, it is still just partial knowledge. (Isaias 55:9) “For my thoughts are not your thoughts: nor your ways my ways, saith the Lord. For as the heavens are exalted above the earth, so are my ways exalted above your ways, and my thoughts above your thoughts.” Only God’s knowledge of creation is exhaustive and so who better to consult? What would take men years to figure out and at a great cost, God can reveal to a humble soul in a single moment. But in the end, God chooses whom He chooses.

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